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Re: Sheba and Sammuramat
In Response To: Sheba and Sammuramat ()

A long time ago you made this entry quoting another source;

"Speaking of Semiramis, Georges Roux writes in "Ancient Iraq" (p 301-2):

"How this queen, whose reign has left hardly a trace in Assyrian records, acquired the reputation of being The legend of Semiramis, as told in the first century B.C. by Dioduorus Siculus - who drew his material from the now lost Persica of Ctesias, a Greek author and physician at the court of Artaxerxes II - is that of a manly woman born of a Syrian goddess, who became queen of Assyria by marrying Ninus, the mythical founder of Nineveh, founded Babylon, built astonishing monuments in Persia, conquered Media, Egypt, Libya and Bactria, conducted an unsuccessful military expedition in India and turned into a dove on her death. This legend contains many ingredients, including a possible confusion with Naqi'a/Zakutu (the wife of Sennacherib, who supervised the reconstruction of Babylon destroyed by her husband), as well as reminiscences of the conquests of Darius I, of the Indian war of Alexander the Great, and even of the Achaemenian court with the terrible queen-mother Parysatis. Semiramis also shares some traits with Ishtar as a war goddess who, like her, destroyed her lovers."

Firstly:

"'the most beautiful, most cruel, most powerful and most lustful of Oriental queens' is a most baffling problem."

Since you know I am a revisionist of sorts, the above sounds a lot like one of the other famous queens of Egypt, and that off course is Cleopatra!

Second:

"became queen of Assyria by marrying Ninus, the mythical founder of Nineveh, founded Babylon, built astonishing monuments in Persia, conquered Media, Egypt, Libya and Bactria, conducted an unsuccessful military expedition in India and turned into a dove on her death."

As has been reported, Cleo had an affair with Caesar and a close friend of Caesar, both of whom met strange and untimely deaths.

As another source states;

"As children, Cleopatra and her siblings wittnessed the defeat of their guardian, Pompey, by Julius Caesar in a duel. Meanwhile, Cleopatra and her brother/husband Ptolemy XIII were duelling, albeit silently, over the throne.

In the middle of all this turmoil, Julius Caesar left Rome for Alexandria in 48 BC. During his stay in the Palace, he received the most famous gift in history: an oriental carpet... with a 22 year old Cleopatra wrapped in. She counted on Caesar's support to alienate Ptolemy XIII. With the arrival of Roman reinforcements, and after a few battles in Alexandria, Ptolemy XIII was defeated and killed.

In the summer of 47 BC, having married her younger brother Ptolemy XIV, Cleopatra and Caesar embarked for a two month trip along the Nile, aboard a legendary boat. Together, they visited Dendara, where Cleoptara was being worshipped as Pharaoh, an honor beyond Caesar's reach. They became lovers, and indeed, she bore him a son, Caesarion. In 45 BC, Cleopatra and Caesarion left Alexandria for Rome, where they stayed in a palace built by Caesar in their honor.

Caesar's acts were anything but overlooked by the Romans. In 44 BC, he was killed in a conspiracy by his Senators. With his death, Rome split between supporters of Mark Antony and Octavian. Cleopatra was watching in silence, and when Mark Antony seemed to prevail, she supported him and, shortly after, they too became lovers."

Thus here was Cleo who by virtue of her relationship with the Caesars and Caesars to be, could readly be called a Queen of Assyria and any other areas under the control of Caesar or Mark Anthony! Thus, in true "revisionist" thought she Cleopatra fits most uniformly the same image as that of the other queenly predecessors!

Please feel free to delete this message at your descretion!

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