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Schoch Doctor and the Christ Myth

The current issue of Atlantis Rising (#75, May/June '09) features an article, 'The Mythical Jesus: Is Christianity Based on Historical Facts or Ancient Mystery Traditions' by Robert Schoch (of Sphinx re-dating fame).

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Robert+Schoch

This article would be of little interest if it were not written by Robert Schoch. In this article Schoch declares himself a proponent of Achara S (author of 'The Christ Conspiracy') and the 'Jesus Never Existed' school.

The polarization in Jesus research is symptomatic of Western right-brained approaches to almost everything. Jesus can only be one thing (a myth) or the other (a person). In reality Jesus was always both. It was the mandate of each royal generation to make it so. The gods were "reincarnated" in the various historical personages of the royal family in order to perpetuate their claim to divine kingship.

Schoch discusses a series of coins with astrological themes minted in Egypt by Emperor Antoninus Pius in the mid-2nd Century. Pius was one of the least superstitious of Roman emperors, yet in Egypt he fulfills the expectation that a king should be the earthly embodiment of cosmological motion and order. The image of Pius on one side of these coins and astrological wonders on the other projects him as a Messianic figure to the Egyptian people. Non-royal persons need not apply for this status, and even amongst royal candidates "many were called but few were chosen".

Schoch recognizes that even as the Age of Pisces was breaking a new universal religion, Christianity, was deliberately being authored as a reformulation of eclectic mythological traditions. However, for some unknown reason, the Roman Empire did not sanction this "sacred" development until the 4th Century. What Schoch doesn't seem to appreciate is that religious innovation was the exclusive bailiwick of the royal family. And like most families, they had at least as many opinions on how to conduct their affairs, religious or otherwise, as they did family members.